FELINE LEUKAEMIA VIRUS (FeLV) INFORMATION

WHAT IS FeLV?
FeLV occurs worldwide and is a virus that suppresses a cat’s immune system.
HOW IS IT TRANSMITTED?
Via bodily fluid like nasal secretions, saliva, faeces, urine and blood.
Therefore it can be transmitted via direct contract, sharing litter boxes/food and water bowls, mutual grooming, fighting and from mother to foetus.
WHAT SYMPTOMS WILL MY CAT SHOW?
The symptoms can range from NO symptoms at all to….
– Weight loss
– Loss of appetite
– Thrifty coat
– Fever
– Pale gums
– Listlessness
– Occurrence of other infections e.g. skin, respiratory system
– Swollen lymph nodes
– Difficulty breathing
HOW DO I KNOW IF MY CAT HAS FeLV?
A simple blood test can be run at your vet to make a diagnosis.
WHICH CATS ARE MORE AT RISK?
– Kittens less than 1 year old
– Cats living with a FeLV-positive cat
– Outdoors cats
– Kittens born to FeLV-positive mothers
IS THERE A TREATMENT?
Sadly there is no treatment for FeLV. However, it is recommended that a good nutritional diet is fed along with a vet check up twice a year.
HOW DO I PREVENT MY CAT FROM BECOMING INFECTED?
– There is a preventative vaccination against FeLV. Although this is a
very good vaccination it isn’t 100% protective. Despite this we still
recommend vaccination.
– Do not bring FeLV cats/cats with an unknown history into your
household
– Stop your cat from roaming
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DOG POISONINGS

The most common malicious poisoning one tends to see in veterinary practice is that of Temik, also known as “Two Step”. Temik was previously used as an insecticide on farms. It looks very similar to “poppy seeds” and can be bought illegally at taxi ranks and train stations. Burglars place it in meat such as sausage or mince, which is then thrown over the wall of a house so the dogs on the property can eat it. Signs of poisoning are usually seen within 5-20 minutes.

The most common signs are: Excessive salivation, vomiting, abdominal pain defaecation/diarrhoea, not wanting to eat, runny eyes/nose, difficulty breathing/blue gums, muscle twitching, restlessness, paralysis.

If you suspect your dog has been poisoned, call your security company/SAPS immediately to alert them. Your pet will need emergency veterinary treatment, so know where your 24 hour vet is as these episodes usually happen in the middle of the night.

FOURWAYS VET – 011 705 3411

BRYANSTON VET – 011 706 6023/4/5.

If possible get your animal to eat a large meal like tinned food, bread etc. It helps when the vet tries to make them vomit to get the poison out and also helps absorb the poison. If in any doubt call the vet to discuss or take your pet in for a check up.

IF MY PET IS BLIND DO I NEED TO EUTHANASE HIM OR HER??

We often get presented with blind animals in our practice, and the question which inevitably follows is do I need to euthanase my pet? The simple answer is definitely NO!!! Blind animals cope exceptionally well, as their other senses compensate and they can live a perfectly normal life otherwise. Remember that animals already depend on us, so if they need to a little more it doesn’t make a big difference. Swimming pools, balconies and busy roads can pose tricky areas so make sure your pet is safe around these areas.  Here are some tips on keeping your blind pet happy and comfortable:

1) Try not to change around the furniture. They have taken the time to learn where everything is, don’t confuse them!

2) Cover the pool area or use a Safety Turtle alarm (attach to collar and if it makes contact with water it sends an alarm signal into your house). Available from PoolSafe SA.

3) Barricade balcony edges so they can’t fall off.

4) Fence your property and keep gates closed so there is no access to the road.

5) Toys which make a noise are the best 🙂

6) Keep an identity tag/microchip on your pet. You never know…

7) Always keep on a leash (or a harness is even better) when outside the safe confines of your home. It helps guide them along the way.

8) If you don’t already have another pet, but are thinking of getting another one, now couldn’t be a better time. Blind animals tend to use their visual counterparts as a guide around the house.

DIWALI FIREWORKS WARNING: HOW TO KEEP YOUR ANIMALS SAFE WITH SOME BASIC PRECAUTIONS  

1) Walk your animal prior to the fireworks event. This helps tire them out and reduces stress.
2) Close all windows and doors to reduce noise levels.
3) Keep animals inside.
4) Provide a treat to help reward good behaviour and act as a distraction.
5) Products such as Calmeze or calming pheromone collars for cats can be used.
6) Make sure all pets are wearing ID tags. They can easily get scared and run off.
7) MOST IMPORTANTLY…ACT CALM YOURSELF!!! Continue as you would normally as if nothing is different.

TO MICROCHIP OR NOT TO MICROCHIP??

This issue has become a much debated one and personally, why on earth would you not microchip your pet??!! The benefits are obvious and far outweigh the minor discomfort of a once off injection to insert the chip, and remember if your animal is under sedation/anaesthetic for another procedure then to insert a chip is painless. The countless hours I have spent scanning lost animals for chips could have been much better spent and so many pets are never ever reunited with their original owner despite our best efforts. Microchips are inexpensive and are a permanent form of identification. Collars and tags can so easily get lost or removed. Losing a pet is extremely traumatic for all involved and the costs of placing ads, calling around and time spent searching quickly add up.
Pets, especially cats, can easily get out of properties whether it be a gate left open, via holes in fences or even digging under walls. Never say never!
If your pet could speak, they would definitely say “Thanks for microchipping me, I promise not to wee in the house or chew the carpet anymore!”
Seriously though, think about it…
Here at Olivedale Vet we use Identipet Chips and the costs involved are:
R399 (cost of chip and to insert chip)
R65 (IDENTIPET Annual Service Fee) OR R425 (IDENTIPET once off Lifetime Membership Fee). Paid directly to IDENTIPET.

DO NOT GIVE YOUR CAT PARACETAMOL (PANADO) !!!

Please note cats and Paracetamol do not go together  Cats cannot metabolise the active ingredient which therefore causes a toxicity in the body. Paracetamol in cats affects the ability of the blood to carry oxygen and causes liver damage. If your cat has ingested Paracetamol you need to get to a vet ASAP as there is an antidote but treatment needs to be administered quickly for it to be effective. Untreated… Deadly!!!